Trip date: December 15, 2016 I just wrapped up the semester last week with final exams, and I’ve been hitting the mountains every day (all two of them) since. I’ve been warming up my legs for bigger winter trips later in the season, so far so good. Stats Area: Mount Seymour Provincial Park, North Vancouver, BC. Objective: Dog Mountain Cumulative elevation gain: 296m Round trip distance: 4.9km Trail type: Out-and-back Nearby hikes: Mystery Lake, Dinkey Peak, First Pump, Tim Jones Peak Good to Know: This trail is well…

The second peak of Mount Seymour is the last peak before the main summit in the sequence of bumps starting from the parking lot. Unofficially known as “Second Peak” or “Second Pump”, the BC Provincial Government is in the process of renaming it “Tim Jones Peak” after the long time Team Leader of North Shore Rescue, who passed away on January 19, 2014 while hiking on Mt. Seymour. BC Parks and the BC Government have already approved the placement of a memorial plaque, a new SAR helicopter landing…

The above photo is of a sunrise taken along Seymour Road, located in the Mt. Seymour Provincial Park, BC. This moment is symbolic of the new year ahead; new goals, new ambitions, and a new start. Well, it’s that time of year again, where I spend a some time to reflect on the past 12 months. It’ll take way too long to summarize the year, a lot has happened! With the help of friends and family, I’ve started building my brand as ‘Adventures of a T1D‘ and designed…

Trip date: November 11, 2015 I assume everyone’s caught up with the good news we’ve had lately, there’s a bunch of snow accumulation in the mountains. Ryan and I planned to get out somewhere on Remembrance Day, we decided to stay nearby and head up First Pump on Mt. Seymour. This is a local hike in the Mount Seymour Provincial Park, located in the North Shore mountains. The trail gives you quick access to alpine and great views of Vancouver and the surrounding mountains. Stats Elevation gain: 848m…

Hi, happy New Year! I don’t have much experience in backcountry travel during winter months. Normally, when the hiking season ends, I hibernate until spring. Last winter, I snowshoed a little bit more than the previous year and this winter, I plan to continue to build my stoke for the season. With a quiet shoulder season, we were aching to get outdoors. On Jan 1, 2015, Ryan and I thought to celebrate the New Year by knocking an item off of our to-hike list: catching a sunset from Mt. Seymour. Snowshoes were…